American Patriot, Nathan Hale

Nathan Hale, a young American schoolteacher turned patriot spy, remains a poignant symbol of sacrifice, bravery, and devotion to the cause of American independence. His short but impactful life unfolded during the early tumultuous years of the American Revolutionary War, leaving an indelible mark on the nation’s history and collective memory. Born on June 6,…

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Ratification of the 19th Amendment 

The United States Constitution’s 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote, was ratified in 1920, marking an important turning point in American history. According to the amendment, “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account…

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Voting Rights Act of 1965

In a landmark piece of American legislation, the Voting Rights Act of 1965 was passed to prohibit racial discrimination in voting, guaranteeing equal access to the ballot for all citizens. Enacted during the height of the civil rights movement, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the bill into law on August 6, 1965. The Act enforces…

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Truman’s Executive Order 9981

Executive Order 9981, a groundbreaking rule aimed at eradicating racial discrimination and segregation in the U.S. Armed Forces, was issued by President Truman on July 26, 1948. During World War II, minorities, especially African Americans, served in segregated military forces. Despite their contributions to the war effort, they were subjected to prejudice and received unfair…

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George Washington and the Residence Act of 1790

The Residence Act of 1790 was a significant piece of legislation signed into law by President George Washington on July 16, 1790. It established the permanent seat of the United States government and laid the groundwork for creating the District of Columbia. During the early years of the United States, the location of the national…

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Compromises in the Creation of the U.S. Constitution 

The United States Constitution was created through a series of compromises among the delegates to the Constitutional Convention of 1787. The delegates, representing 12 of the 13 original states, met in Philadelphia to revise the Articles of Confederation, which had been the governing document of the United States since the American Revolution. However, the delegates…

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What is the difference between the CIA and FBI?

The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) are both intelligence and law enforcement agencies of the United States government, but they have different mandates, responsibilities, and areas of focus. What is the FBI? The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is the primary intelligence and law enforcement agency of the United…

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What Does My Local Government Do?

Local government plays an integral role in the lives of citizens. It has a more significant impact on the daily lives of its citizens than the federal or state government by ensuring its citizens’ needs and interests are met, such as providing clean water and maintaining roads.  Without local government, communities would be unable to…

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Executive Branch Overview

Article II of the US Constitution establishes the executive branch led by the president of the United States. The executive branch comprises the vice president, cabinet, and other executive departments. Its job is to oversee and maintain government functions while carrying out laws passed by Congress.  The president is elected to a four-year term. The…

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Legislative Branch Overview

Article I of the US Constitution establishes the legislature as a bicameral body consisting of the House of Representatives and the Senate. The legislative branch has the power to make laws, approve the budget, and oversee the actions of the executive branch through the power of oversight and impeachment. It also has the power to…

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